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The Most Popular Questions Every Dermatologist Gets Asked – And the Answers

August 4, 2021

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The Most Popular Questions Every Dermatologist Gets Asked – And the Answers

Dermatologists are the people we turn to when we have questions about our skin. Whether it’s acne, rosacea, or what skincare products to use while pregnant, dermatologists have all the answers. They’re the experts on skincare and the best people to ask when you have questions. Everyone from influencers to beauty editors and celebrities turn to dermatologists when they have a question. Finding – and affording to have – a dermatologist isn’t easy.
There are some questions that every dermatologist gets asked. We’re rounding up the seven most common questions that everyone asks their dermatologist – including the answers! Make sure to bookmark this page, so you have a reference for the next time you need a dermatologist’s help.

Q: Does my diet affect acne?

A: There’s a common misconception that acne is the direct result of an unhealthy diet. For most people, their acne is the result of their genetics and hormones. That doesn’t mean that your diet can’t play a role in preventing or causing acne. A small group of people can be sensitive to products with dairy ingredients and refined sugars. If you think your diet is the culprit, it’s best to go and speak directly with a dermatologist.
Cutting food groups, such as dairy, out of your diet without the approval and support of a dermatologist can lead to other health issues, including disordered eating. If you notice that your acne starts to flare up when you’re eating dairy, you could switch to a plant-based alternative that is lower on the GI index. While oat milk is popular, unsweetened soy milk and almond milk is a better choice.
Dairy won’t be the issue if you’re adding a splash of milk to your coffee in the morning. You’ll need to be consuming it in large volumes or through food like a whey protein supplement for it to impact your skin.
However, changing your diet isn’t enough to stop your acne breakouts. You’ll also need to undergo prescription treatment alongside changing your diet.

Q: Is the SPF in my moisturiser the same as the SPF in my sunscreen?


A: If you’re ever walked around a department store, you’ll have spotted skincare products that include SPF as one of their main selling points. The SPF that you find in your daily moisturiser undergoes the same testing for the SPF in sunscreen. If your moisturiser says that it is SP50, it will provide an SPF of 30.
The difference between a moisturiser and sunscreen is that their formulas have a shorter staying power. These formulas are less resistant and have a thinner consistency than sunscreen, meaning that you don’t get the same protection from your moisturiser.
It’s also worth highlighting that SPF moisturisers don’t necessarily also include UVA protection. If you’re looking for SPF, you want to make sure it’s also protecting you against UV ageing.

Q: Do popular collagen supplements really work?


A: Collagen supplements are everywhere that you look on social media. Everyone from celebrities to influencers are promoting this ‘wonder’ product and selling it as though it’s the fountain of youth. While collagen supplements are cleverly marketed, they’re not all that they’re hyped up to be.
The main thing going against collagen supplements is that there’s no evidence to suggest that they work in the first place. What makes it difficult is that collagen is essentially a protein. If you consume it in a supplement form, your body will break it down into amino acids and digest it, passing it through your body. It won’t go directly to your skin to give you the desired anti-aging effect.
If you’re willing to spend the money on collagen supplements, you could invest that money elsewhere. Collagen supplements are some of the most expensive products in the beauty industry and can make you feel like you’re putting money down the drain.
Instead of using collagen supplements, focus on wearing sunscreen and following a healthy diet. Keep on top of your skincare routine and use retinol as your main anti-aging treatment. Until there’s data to suggest that collagen supplements work, it’s best skipping them for now.

Q: Will my constant breakouts go away?


A: It’s easy to feel frustrated when you’re constantly dealing with breakouts on your skin. It’s a common misconception that they’re something only teenagers deal with. Most women deal with breakouts through their thirties and beyond. If you want to get rid of your breakouts, the best way is to use an anti-acne skincare routine.
The benefit of these products is that they’re often ideal for tackling the causes of premature aging. You can have the best of both worlds, helping your skin look better while tackling your breakouts.

Q: When should I start having injectables?


A: Injectables are becoming one of the most popular treatments within the skincare world. One question that every dermatologist gets is what is the right age to start taking injectables. Can you be too young or too old for injectables?
Most people choose to start using injectables from their mid-thirties onwards. However, it’s more about the condition of your skin than your age – particularly how your skin is aging. There is no ‘right’ age for starting injectables as your skin’s aging process will depend on your genetics. Everything from your diet to sun exposure and stress will impact your skin’s aging process.
You could have two people of the same age with drastically different skin. If you’ve had little sun exposure and your skin is aging slowly, you don’t need to worry about injectables. If you’re the same age and spend most of your time outdoors in the sun, you’re likely to start experiencing lines and a loss of volume in your face earlier.
Your ethnicity and complexion will also impact what age you should start injectables at. If you have blonde hair, blue eyes, and a fair complexion, you’ll start to age earlier than someone with Asian skin due to their melanin.

Q: How do I know if my skincare routine is working?


A: When you spend hundreds (and possibly thousands!) on your skincare, you want to make sure that it’s working. Most skincare products can take weeks for you to start to see results. Consistency is key and you shouldn’t expect your skin to transform overnight.
People get frustrated with their skincare routine when they’re not seeing results. The main problem is that people don’t know what they need and don’t need in their skincare routine. It’s easy to fall into the hype around the latest must-have skincare product, which might not work for your skin or even be needed in your routine. Niacinamide and tranexamic acid are two of these ingredients that not everyone needs, even though they’re constantly talked about.
It’s easy to assume that you need to be using dozens of skincare products. The best skincare routines are those that focus on a smaller set of products that offer multiple benefits. You want every product to be working overtime to protect and rejuvenate your skin. Identify what your skincare concerns are and look for the ingredients that can target multiple issues.
Vitamin A is one ingredient that almost everyone should be using. It can fulfil the place of retinol, niacinamide, and tranexamic acid. It’s an anti-aging ingredient that also works for tackling imperfections like acne and pigmentation.
Most dermatologist end up taking their client’s skincare routine and removing products, instead of adding products. Take a close look at every skincare product in your routine and ask if you really need it. If it’s not working, swap it out for something that will.

Q: Will anyone be able to tell if I’ve started to have Botox?


A: One thing that puts people off investing in Botox is the idea that it’ll be easy to tell that they’ve had work done. We’ve all heard of horror stories and know of celebrities who are daunted by the media for their excessive use of Botox to prevent aging and to fill out their face.
If your Botox is applied properly, no one will be able to tell that you’ve had work done unless you tell them. You want to make sure that you’re working with a licensed aesthetician, who knows what they’re doing. It’s always a good idea to ask to see a reference or portfolio of their previous work.
Your aesthetician will work closely with you to correctly inject your Botox. Most clients will focus on softening strong lines and applying Botox in a way that releases tension in the face. Botox has evolved greatly since the days of the ‘90s, when people were often said to have ‘frozen faces’ and couldn’t move their features. The key to keeping your Botox looking natural is to microdose and undergo a strict treatment of Botox that ensures you’re not going for more appointments than you need.


What questions would you ask a dermatologist if you could? Let us know in the comments below!

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